3 4 page recap

Hello there, please write 3/4 of a page for each artical on your opinion, what you learned from the article andhow you think you can use going forward.
don’t need reference page.

The Four Obsessions of an
Extraordinary Executive
A Leadership Fable
by Patrick Lencioni
Summary
The Heart of the Matter
The key to successful management is to spot a few things that will make a difference in
your organization and then concentrate on doing them.
Successfu l organizations are smart and healthy. A smart organization shows its intelligence
in its thoughtful strategies, well-designed products and solid fi nancial infrastructure. A
smart organization uses careful and caring personnel policies, in-depth communication
and sound, effective marketing to beat its competition. Healthy organizations get smarter
and smarter. They are unifi ed, not splintered by politics and infi ghting. They survive and
prosper even in hard times. Employees stay committed to them.
Only the boss, the top dog, the CEO can make an organization healthy. All health and
goodness fl ows from the corner offi ce. The boss has the touch of kings. To exercise this
healing touch, the boss has to do four things obsessively:
1. Build a united leadership team.
2. Dispel confusion at the upper levels and maintain unity.
3. Communicate, communicate, communicate.
4. Use human systems to sharpen and clarify the organizationâ€s focus.
Here is a fable that will make this advice crystal clear.
Rival
Vince Green was founder and CEO of Greenwich Consulting. It earned revenues of $80
million per year. Another man might have been happy, but Vince was not. Vince was
bitter. He wanted his big competitor, Telegraph Partners, to be extinct, defunct and dead.
Everybody seemed to love Telegraph. The press lavished attention on Telegraph. Its
clients spread great word-of-mouth about Telegraph, and stayed with it even when times
were bad. Telegraph easily recruited the best and the brightest employees. It made even
more money each year than Greenwich. Most galling of all, Telegraphâ€s CEO, Rich
Oâ€Connor, seemed to ignore Greenwich. He never mentioned Greenwich, his biggest
competitor! Never took notice!
Vince Green had spied on Telegraph, researched Telegraph, done everything he could to
discover Telegraphâ€s secret formula for success. Alas, he couldnâ€t fi nd anything he could
use. Then he caught a break.
Reconnaissance
Vince Green had hired a consultant to compare Greenwich and Telegraph. The consultant
surprised him by saying that such a comparison was almost impossible because
Greenwich and Telegraph had very little in common. How could this be?
The consultant explained that Telegraph had a unique culture. Employees loved the
place. They never sued over wrongful termination. Clients loved it. It was hard to put
a fi nger on why, precisely, but Telegraph had a very healthy culture, overall, and was a
very strong organization. Vince Green was shocked, perplexed and apoplectic. For this,
heâ€d paid a consultant? But then he had an idea. He had a phone number somewhere of
someone who might help.
A Tale of Two Chiefs
Would Vince Green have resented Telegraphâ€s CEO Rich Oâ€Connor so deeply if the
two men hadnâ€t shared a past? Theyâ€d both gone to one of Californiaâ€s best colleges.
Vince had graduated near t he top of the c lass, had made a lot of excellent business
contacts, worked for a prestigious consultancy and followed the stock market religiously.
Oâ€Connor, by contrast, had supported himself by working as a waiter, did not network
and, in fact, did not do anything that ought to have spelled success.
People h ad h igh expectations f or V ince G reen w hen he s tarted G reenwich, his own
consulting fi rm. People had no expectations for Rich Oâ€Connor when he started Telegraph,
a competing consultancy. No one noticed Oâ€Connor. Why should they? For a while, the
two companies competed on fairly equal terms. Then Telegraph opened a huge lead.
Revelation
Despite Telegraphâ€s success, Rich h ad b een thinking o f selling h is c ompany. The
pressure just seemed too great. He was missing his kids†Little League games, had no
time to play with his children, worked 70 hours or more a week and couldnâ€t give his
family the time it needed.
But how could he sell the company he had founded, nurtured and loved? No, that wouldnâ€t
do. Instead, he decided to try something radical — he would reduce his work week to
merely 50 hours and see if he could bring things into balance. It didnâ€t seem to help.
One night he asked himself what one thing really had to happen at the fi rm. He ended up
writing down four disciplines on a yellow sheet of paper. The next day, he taped the list to
his desk where he could see it all the time. Soon, everyone at the company was talking about
“the yellow sheet.” Oddly, Rich never told anyone what was on it, and no one ever looked.
What Richâ€s List Told Him to Do
Rich cut way back on the things he did at the company, but he insisted on personally
interviewing every new candidate for employment. Eventually, he had to limit himself to just
interviewing senior people — the company was growing too fast for him to meet prospective
fi le clerks and janitors. He had to expand his workweek to 55 hours a week just to keep
up with everything he really needed to f ollow. A third of h is t ime went to interviewing
employees — not only new employees, but old ones, too, to stay linked with them.
The Vacation that Wasnâ€t
Rich was working so hard that his wife insisted he take a vacation. Six whole days away
from the company! Rich had never done anything that bold. When Tom, his loyal Chief
Operating Offi cer, called him during his trip, Rich was covertly delighted.
But then Tom said he wanted to offer a relatively senior job to a guy Rich had never met.
Tom said that everyone at Telegraph who had gotten to know Jamie liked him and that
his values seemed to refl ect the fi rmâ€s principles. Rich went against his usual habit and
practice and allowed Tom to hire Jamie without meeting him. Big mistake.
Tense Moments
Rich knew right away that heâ€d made the wrong decision. He knew it deep down. He
came back to the fi rm nagged by all kinds of doubts and hesitations. He had actually
allowed a new, high-ranking employee to join the company without having met him
fi rst. He tried to convince himself it was no big deal, but in fact it was a very big deal.
Rich just didnâ€t have a good feeling about Jamie. Yet the people who had hired Jamie
didnâ€t understand why.
Jamie knew he had friends at the company, but he didnâ€t know how he could unite
them behind him for a battle against Rich. Alas, politics had snaked its way into the
Eden of Telegraph.
The Problem with Jamie
Jamie didnâ€t fi t the Telegraph culture. Rich wanted to fi re him, but his lawyer said that
wouldnâ€t be a good idea. The company hadnâ€t given him a negative performance review
or a warning. A wrongful dismissal suit could be very costly. Richâ€s lawyer told him to
go through the necessary preliminary steps fi rst.
Rich called Jamie into his offi ce, and bluntly said he didnâ€t think Jamie was a good fi t. Jamie
crossed his legs confi dently and observed this was something they could discuss. Rich said
that from what he had seen, Jamie hadnâ€t “developed real, honest relationships with the rest
of my team.” Moreover, Rich himself didnâ€t feel any particular connection with him.
Jamie brushed Richâ€s concerns aside, rationalized them, fl attered Rich, told a lie and
pretended to think deeply about Richâ€s comments, but he had a secret agenda. He asked
to see the yellow paper listing Richâ€s core business tenets. Rich generously had his
assistant make a copy for Jamie. He felt dirty when he handed it over; he felt as if heâ€d
given a bit of himself away cheaply.
Betrayal
Jamie made plans to take Richâ€s secret to Telegraphâ€s biggest competitor: Greenwich! He
had interviewed with Greenwich before joining Telegraph. And, what a coincidence —
Vince Green had just telephoned him again.
But Itâ€s Not Just the List
Unf ortunately, the list w as n ot m agic, as J amie a nd V ince s oon learned. T he l ist
described the basic disciplines that Rich practiced. But just knowing the disciplines was
not the trick: the magic lay in practicing them consistently. Persistence made Richâ€s
company a big success. Vinceâ€s Greenwich was an unhealthy company because Vince
himself was unhealthy, unbalanced and undisciplined. To change the organization, he
would have to change himself.
The First Discipline: Build a United Leadership Team
To build a united and effective leadership team, the members (starting with the CEO) have
to know themselves and be open and honest with each other. They have to respect each
other and value each otherâ€s time. They should be polite and attentive at meetings. They
must shun infi ghting and patch up any differences before they have a chance to fester.
The Second Discipline: Dispel Confusion at the Upper Levels
Once the leadership team is aware and unifi ed, they can approach the second discipline:
making the fundamental values of the organization very clear to everyone in it, by actions
as well as words. By offering a clear set of visions and goals, they join people together.
The Third Discipline: Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
Organizational clarity leads not only to communication but to deliberate, enthusiastic
over-communication. Over-communication, that is, tons of repetition, is a good thing —
it means no one ever has to wonder what top management is really thinking or planning.
The Fourth Discipline: Human Systems Should Fortify Clarity
Because of over-communication, organizations can implement the fourth discipline —
strengthen your clarity and sharpen your f ocus t hrough human systems. This means
hiring the right people, rewarding and recognizing them appropriately, and having the
right approach to dismissing them when that proves necessary.
The f ormula f or Telegraphâ€s s uccess r esided i n f our simple d isciplines s cratched o n
yellow paper and taped to a desk. They were not secret; the only secret thing about them
was the need for constant practice.
About The Author
Patrick Lencioni i s author o f the b est-selling The Five Temptations of a CEO and
The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. Heâ€s president of the Table Group, a managementconsulting
fi rm in the San Francisco Bay area.The Four Obsessions of an
Extraordinary Executive
A Leadership Fable
by Patrick Lencioni
Summary
The Heart of the Matter
The key to successful management is to spot a few things that will make a difference in
your organization and then concentrate on doing them.
Successfu l organizations are smart and healthy. A smart organization shows its intelligence
in its thoughtful strategies, well-designed products and solid fi nancial infrastructure. A
smart organization uses careful and caring personnel policies, in-depth communication
and sound, effective marketing to beat its competition. Healthy organizations get smarter
and smarter. They are unifi ed, not splintered by politics and infi ghting. They survive and
prosper even in hard times. Employees stay committed to them.
Only the boss, the top dog, the CEO can make an organization healthy. All health and
goodness fl ows from the corner offi ce. The boss has the touch of kings. To exercise this
healing touch, the boss has to do four things obsessively:
1. Build a united leadership team.
2. Dispel confusion at the upper levels and maintain unity.
3. Communicate, communicate, communicate.
4. Use human systems to sharpen and clarify the organizationâ€s focus.
Here is a fable that will make this advice crystal clear.
Rival
Vince Green was founder and CEO of Greenwich Consulting. It earned revenues of $80
million per year. Another man might have been happy, but Vince was not. Vince was
bitter. He wanted his big competitor, Telegraph Partners, to be extinct, defunct and dead.
Everybody seemed to love Telegraph. The press lavished attention on Telegraph. Its
clients spread great word-of-mouth about Telegraph, and stayed with it even when times
were bad. Telegraph easily recruited the best and the brightest employees. It made even
more money each year than Greenwich. Most galling of all, Telegraphâ€s CEO, Rich
Oâ€Connor, seemed to ignore Greenwich. He never mentioned Greenwich, his biggest
competitor! Never took notice!
Vince Green had spied on Telegraph, researched Telegraph, done everything he could to
discover Telegraphâ€s secret formula for success. Alas, he couldnâ€t fi nd anything he could
use. Then he caught a break.
Reconnaissance
Vince Green had hired a consultant to compare Greenwich and Telegraph. The consultant
surprised him by saying that such a comparison was almost impossible because
Greenwich and Telegraph had very little in common. How could this be?
The consultant explained that Telegraph had a unique culture. Employees loved the
place. They never sued over wrongful termination. Clients loved it. It was hard to put
a fi nger on why, precisely, but Telegraph had a very healthy culture, overall, and was a
very strong organization. Vince Green was shocked, perplexed and apoplectic. For this,
heâ€d paid a consultant? But then he had an idea. He had a phone number somewhere of
someone who might help.
A Tale of Two Chiefs
Would Vince Green have resented Telegraphâ€s CEO Rich Oâ€Connor so deeply if the
two men hadnâ€t shared a past? Theyâ€d both gone to one of Californiaâ€s best colleges.
Vince had graduated near t he top of the c lass, had made a lot of excellent business
contacts, worked for a prestigious consultancy and followed the stock market religiously.
Oâ€Connor, by contrast, had supported himself by working as a waiter, did not network
and, in fact, did not do anything that ought to have spelled success.
People h ad h igh expectations f or V ince G reen w hen he s tarted G reenwich, his own
consulting fi rm. People had no expectations for Rich Oâ€Connor when he started Telegraph,
a competing consultancy. No one noticed Oâ€Connor. Why should they? For a while, the
two companies competed on fairly equal terms. Then Telegraph opened a huge lead.
Revelation
Despite Telegraphâ€s success, Rich h ad b een thinking o f selling h is c ompany. The
pressure just seemed too great. He was missing his kids†Little League games, had no
time to play with his children, worked 70 hours or more a week and couldnâ€t give his
family the time it needed.
But how could he sell the company he had founded, nurtured and loved? No, that wouldnâ€t
do. Instead, he decided to try something radical — he would reduce his work week to
merely 50 hours and see if he could bring things into balance. It didnâ€t seem to help.
One night he asked himself what one thing really had to happen at the fi rm. He ended up
writing down four disciplines on a yellow sheet of paper. The next day, he taped the list to
his desk where he could see it all the time. Soon, everyone at the company was talking about
“the yellow sheet.” Oddly, Rich never told anyone what was on it, and no one ever looked.
What Richâ€s List Told Him to Do
Rich cut way back on the things he did at the company, but he insisted on personally
interviewing every new candidate for employment. Eventually, he had to limit himself to just
interviewing senior people — the company was growing too fast for him to meet prospective
fi le clerks and janitors. He had to expand his workweek to 55 hours a week just to keep
up with everything he really needed to f ollow. A third of h is t ime went to interviewing
employees — not only new employees, but old ones, too, to stay linked with them.
The Vacation that Wasnâ€t
Rich was working so hard that his wife insisted he take a vacation. Six whole days away
from the company! Rich had never done anything that bold. When Tom, his loyal Chief
Operating Offi cer, called him during his trip, Rich was covertly delighted.
But then Tom said he wanted to offer a relatively senior job to a guy Rich had never met.
Tom said that everyone at Telegraph who had gotten to know Jamie liked him and that
his values seemed to refl ect the fi rmâ€s principles. Rich went against his usual habit and
practice and allowed Tom to hire Jamie without meeting him. Big mistake.
Tense Moments
Rich knew right away that heâ€d made the wrong decision. He knew it deep down. He
came back to the fi rm nagged by all kinds of doubts and hesitations. He had actually
allowed a new, high-ranking employee to join the company without having met him
fi rst. He tried to convince himself it was no big deal, but in fact it was a very big deal.
Rich just didnâ€t have a good feeling about Jamie. Yet the people who had hired Jamie
didnâ€t understand why.
Jamie knew he had friends at the company, but he didnâ€t know how he could unite
them behind him for a battle against Rich. Alas, politics had snaked its way into the
Eden of Telegraph.
The Problem with Jamie
Jamie didnâ€t fi t the Telegraph culture. Rich wanted to fi re him, but his lawyer said that
wouldnâ€t be a good idea. The company hadnâ€t given him a negative performance review
or a warning. A wrongful dismissal suit could be very costly. Richâ€s lawyer told him to
go through the necessary preliminary steps fi rst.
Rich called Jamie into his offi ce, and bluntly said he didnâ€t think Jamie was a good fi t. Jamie
crossed his legs confi dently and observed this was something they could discuss. Rich said
that from what he had seen, Jamie hadnâ€t “developed real, honest relationships with the rest
of my team.” Moreover, Rich himself didnâ€t feel any particular connection with him.
Jamie brushed Richâ€s concerns aside, rationalized them, fl attered Rich, told a lie and
pretended to think deeply about Richâ€s comments, but he had a secret agenda. He asked
to see the yellow paper listing Richâ€s core business tenets. Rich generously had his
assistant make a copy for Jamie. He felt dirty when he handed it over; he felt as if heâ€d
given a bit of himself away cheaply.
Betrayal
Jamie made plans to take Richâ€s secret to Telegraphâ€s biggest competitor: Greenwich! He
had interviewed with Greenwich before joining Telegraph. And, what a coincidence —
Vince Green had just telephoned him again.
But Itâ€s Not Just the List
Unf ortunately, the list w as n ot m agic, as J amie a nd V ince s oon learned. T he l ist
described the basic disciplines that Rich practiced. But just knowing the disciplines was
not the trick: the magic lay in practicing them consistently. Persistence made Richâ€s
company a big success. Vinceâ€s Greenwich was an unhealthy company because Vince
himself was unhealthy, unbalanced and undisciplined. To change the organization, he
would have to change himself.
The First Discipline: Build a United Leadership Team
To build a united and effective leadership team, the members (starting with the CEO) have
to know themselves and be open and honest with each other. They have to respect each
other and value each otherâ€s time. They should be polite and attentive at meetings. They
must shun infi ghting and patch up any differences before they have a chance to fester.
The Second Discipline: Dispel Confusion at the Upper Levels
Once the leadership team is aware and unifi ed, they can approach the second discipline:
making the fundamental values of the organization very clear to everyone in it, by actions
as well as words. By offering a clear set of visions and goals, they join people together.
The Third Discipline: Communicate, Communicate, Communicate
Organizational clarity leads not only to communication but to deliberate, enthusiastic
over-communication. Over-communication, that is, tons of repetition, is a good thing —
it means no one ever has to wonder what top management is really thinking or planning.
The Fourth Discipline: Human Systems Should Fortify Clarity
Because of over-communication, organizations can implement the fourth discipline —
strengthen your clarity and sharpen your f ocus t hrough human systems. This means
hiring the right people, rewarding and recognizing them appropriately, and having the
right approach to dismissing them when that proves necessary.
The f ormula f or Telegraphâ€s s uccess r esided i n f our simple d isciplines s cratched o n
yellow paper and taped to a desk. They were not secret; the only secret thing about them
was the need for constant practice.
About The Author
Patrick Lencioni i s author o f the b est-selling The Five Temptations of a CEO and
The Five Dysfunctions of a Team. Heâ€s president of the Table Group, a managementconsulting
fi rm in the San Francisco Bay area.
 
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